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Security

Viruses and trojans can cause devastating damage to data but a compromised system is an even bigger threat. Security policies for servers and networks need to be sophisticated and up-to-date to keep pace with the increasing dangers associated with connecting your LAN to the internet.

Because Linux is so much more configurable than Windows it makes an ideal starting-point for security. Even if your office network consists mainly of Windows workstations that doesn't stop you taking the advantage of all the security features Linux has to offer. You should think of using Linux for server machines, particularly within de-militarised zones (DMZ's) and on any public-facing machines.

We can help you decide which services to disable on your public-facing machines - a key factor in keeping intruders out. We also recommend the use of OpenSSH to replace telnet connections with encrypted data transmission. This can even be grafted onto Windows machines by installing Cygwin - a UNIX emulation layer on top of which a host of standard UNIX utilities, including OpenSSH, can run and connect with Linux machines.

When it comes to running services in a secure environment we can advise regarding the creation of 'chroot jails' - a unique feature of Linux/UNIX by which a server process is assigned a pseudo root directory, thereby preventing an intruder from reaching the true root directory on your system, limiting potential damage. We can also help in configuring 'sudo' permissions to limit root access at the command level.